Men’s Fashion Trends Through the Decades

Men in America are, unfortunately, victims of fashion. In order for businessmen to fit in with every other businessman, they are required to be uniformed in any one of an almost infinite variety of similarly colored and fashioned charcoal grey suits, and festooned with a completely superfluous necktie as they conduct their journeys through the business world.

There are a few exceptions to the above rules for business attire, which are, willingly, violated by actors, artists and musicians; completely disregarding the established uniform of business. But, even, their efforts to change men’s fashion are minimal, at best. Clothes designers and fashion houses around the world only slightly modify lapels or buttons on men’s suit coats while going back and forth between pleated pants and straight legged pants. Ralph Lauren, who has produced one of the most successful logos in the world, has, only, increased the size of the polo player on his immensely successful line of polo shirts.

This is not to say that Lauren and other designers don’t produce enchanting designs and products for the consumer. Walk through any of the luxury brand, designer clothing stores and you will drool at the selections of colors and combinations on standard items, which have stood the test of time, and are, today, the same as they were when designed decades ago. Paul Evans makes intricate design modifications on their line of men’s shoes and creates sculpture for the feet. Paul Evans leather shoes bring a near fetish admiration to those of us who pray for something new in men’s fashion. Yes, Paul Evans is different but not revolutionary.

But there is a revolutionary effort to discontinue the use of the necktie. The revolutionaries are lecturers, professors, and writers who appear in, otherwise, formal attire but tie-less, when lecturing or debating others, who are, usually, attired in coat and tie. Viva la revolucion!
When a businessman retires he is hard pressed to wear neckties again in his life. They are held in such disregard by those who no longer have to wear them.

Examine the futurists ideas about clothes design, and realize that we have not really come very far since their ideas were expressed. In 2001, A Space Odyssey produced in 1968, Arthur Clarke was looking into the future, and seeing cell phones, personal computers, but the revolutionary dress styles of Dr. Heywood Floyd, sadly, never made it to the fashion world.